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Principles of the Grain Trade of Western Canada Clarence Brett Piper

Principles of the Grain Trade of Western Canada

Clarence Brett Piper

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER IV. COUNTRYMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER IV. COUNTRY ELEVATORS Economic value--Country elevators are part of the system necessary for handling grain in bulk. They, in common with all other grain elevators, are built to take advantage of the flowing property of grain acted upon by the force of gravity. The purpose of the elevator is to cheaply handle grain in bulk by substituting simple machinery for human labor. One man with the aid of modern machinery is able to quickly perform work which would require many men at hand labor. A modern country elevator will load a thousand bushel car in one to one and a half hours when the grain is already in store. When grain is received from wagons the process is necessarily slower, but even then five thousand bushels will be received and shipped in a ten-hour day or at the rate of five hundred bushels an hour. This includes weighing, which in itself takes an appreciable interval of time for each load. Figuring the average wagon load at sixty bushels, the capacity of the elevator is about seven loads per hour for both receiving and shipping, while the capacity for receiving only is about ten loads per hour. Just compare this with the slow process of loading cars by hand. Imagine the chaotic situation in Western Canada today if there were no country elevators. Supposing on top of the serious labor shortage for harvest and threshing it would be necessary to find enough men to load all cars by hand. Probably not more than a small portion of our present shipments would be in the hands of the railways before the close of navigation. This would be due not only to the slow process of loading each car, but also to the very important cumulative effect of delay on each successive trip. Railway records show that 25 to 30 per cent, of all cars...